ABOVE SCOUT WOOD, MYTHOLMROYD

This walk involves a short taxi ride from the centre of Mytholmroyd (or using two cars), and will give you a fantastic panoramic views above Mytholmroyd. Because the walk is a bit uneven in places it is a bit more challenging than some of the other gentle walks.

Length and time
A little under 2 miles, taking 1½ to 2 hours.

Gradients – how strenuous
Most of the walk is quite flat or with gentle uphills, but the return down to Mytholmroyd (about a mile) is a fair incline. We suggest avoiding this walk after rain as the stone setts going downhill can be slippy.

Terrain – how uneven
The first part of the walk is on a good path, but some short stretches on the lane going back to Mytholmroyd are a bit uneven.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are a couple of dismantled http://healthsavy.com/product/levaquin/ stiles to go over and one set of steps that some people may find a bit awkward.

Facilities
There are a good range of pubs and cafes in Mytholmroyd

Points of interest
The great thing about this walk is the views you get of Mytholmroyd and the hillside above it.

DIRECTIONS

To get to the start of this walk which is a bit of a climb, we suggest you take a taxi from the centre of Mytholmroyd or Hebden Bridge (about £5). The two taxi firms are Valley Taxis Tel 01422 844070 or Calder Valley Taxis Tel 01422 885544. Ask to be put off at the top of Scout Wood (which is up Scout Road). If you have two cars, you can leave a car at the beginning and end of the walk.

Just after the trees peter out on Scout Road, on your right you will see two finger posts which is the start of the walk.

The path above Scout Wood where the walk starts
The path above Scout Wood where the walk starts

Ignore the yellow waymarks and go over the stile or through the gate (it is usually open) and take the path in front of you with a stone wall on your left and trees on your right. The path has quite a gentle incline and after about 200 yards the wall ends and you go through a gap next to a metal gate. The path continues ahead (still going up hill) around the edge of a field, but the fantastic views emerging through the trees make it well worthwhile. A little farther on you cross a low stone stile and we suggest that you stop and look back – it is a pretty amazing view.

The path continues straight ahead with the fence and the trees still on your right (you have to negotiate a dismantled stile which is a bit uneven). The fence curves round to the left (another stop to admire the view of Hebden Bridge and Heptonstall) and after crossing another dismantled stile, eventually the fence stops. Here you have to go down half a dozen steps to drop down to a lane. The steps are sound but they are a bit uneven, so take care.

The steps from the bottom (The photo makes them look steeper than they are)
The steps from the bottom
(The photo makes them look steeper than they are)

You turn right on to the track (called Stake Lane) which is a very old track that comes from Sowerby and now descends back into Mytholmroyd (the track is about a quarter of a mile and is downhill all the way). It is a very attractive route with old hedgerows; parts of the track have large packhorse stones and some of it is cobbled. Because it hasn’t been maintained, some of it is now un-made and a few short sections are quite uneven, also some of the sets can be slippery after rain – take it steady.

A cobbled section of Stake Lane
A cobbled section of Stake Lane
Stake Lane showing a cobbled section that has crumbled
Stake Lane showing a cobbled section that has crumbled

After about 10-15 minutes the lane emerges on to a tarmac junction where you go straight ahead (ignore the first turning to the right) and then take the second right turn down hill. This is a lovely stretch that brings you out into a backwater of Mytholmroyd, sometimes called Stubbings. Ignore left and right turns and keep going downhill until you reach the Methodist Chapel and the junction with Scout Road.

You turn left here, but look at the 17th century house in front of you and, in particular the drip stones above the window. After a few yards, you reach the junction of the main Cragg Road where you turn right. Couple of hundred yards, past the station and over the River Calder, you are back in the centre of Mytholmroyd. Time for some well deserved refreshments.

If you’ve enjoyed this Gentle Walk around Mytholmroyd, why not try some slightly longer routes that take you up onto the hillsides? Mytholmroyd Walkers’ Action have produced leaflets with maps, photographs and clear guidance for three waymarked trails. These are:

  • Wood Top (easy, 2.5 miles)
  • Scout Rock (moderate, 2.5 miles)
  • Churn Milk Joan (more strenuous, 5 miles)
  • A Riverside Walk Between Cragg Vale and Mytholmroyd along the river (moderate 3.5 miles)

The leaflets can be found in Mytholmroyd shops, pubs and library, at the local caravan park and camping shops, and at the Tourist Information Centre in Hebden Bridge.

WALKING THROUGH THE HEATHER ON WADSWORTH MOOR

This circular walk through heather moors is probably the most demanding of all the walks with a long initial incline, but it is on well defined paths and you will be rewarded by several unique panoramic views. Walking through heather moors in the mist can be very disorientating, so don’t attempt to do this walk in poor weather.

Length and time
3 miles, taking about 2 – 2½ hours.

Gradients – how strenuous
The first mile is uphill, but not too steep, but once on the moors it is pretty flat.

Terrain – how uneven
Most of the walk is on clear paths and tracks, but some stretches are a bit uneven. After rain, a few bits can be soft or even muddy. There is one very short steep slope where you have to take it carefully.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are three wooden stiles on this walk, but they are all in good condition.

Facilities
A fine bench near Churn Milk Joan and Lane ends pub if you add ½ mile walk along the road at the end.

Points of interest
This walk provides wonderful views, but also you are also likely to see pheasants, partridge and other upland birds. Churn Milk Joan is a seventeeth century seven foot local standing stone – you might want to leave a coin on the top – people usually do.

DIRECTIONS

Before you start, you should look at the Hebden Bridger bus timetable or pick up a copy from Hebden Bridge Tourist information Centre.

Take the 595 bus to Old Town and ask to be let off at the Mount Skip. The large dwelling here used to be a popular pub until it closed down a few years ago. To the left of the building is a tarmac road up to the Hebden Bridge (Mount Skip) Golf Club (this access road is a public right of way).

The start of the walk at the Mount Skip
The start of the walk at the Mount Skip

Go up the tarmac road for about 100 yards, until you reach the golf club sign before a cattle grid and take the rough grass track that goes off to the left (following the wall on your right). The track skirts the edge of the golf course and passes some old delphs (quarries) on your left – now used as a motor bike scrambles.

After about 200 yards you will see a finger post and stile through the wall (ignore the stile at the blue and white pole). There is a gate a little farther on if that is easier.

The stile on to the golf course path
The stile on to the golf course path

The path goes straight across the golf course (a slight incline), passing a line of small trees to a clearly visible wooden stile (the route of the path itself is indistinct).

Once across the stile follow the small path up to your right which after a few yards joins the Calderdale Way on a well defined track; turn right here. The track which runs behind the club house is clearly defined, keeping quite straight (ignore path going off to the right) and going slightly up hill until you reach a metal gate and wooden stile.

Gateway to the moors
Gateway to the moors

Once over the stile the path is straight ahead through heather (again keep to the Calderdale Way and ignore the path going off to the right). The path is flat, with a paved section because some bits can be a bit boggy. The path joins a fine stone wall on your right which you follow.

After a short distance you come to a fork, take the left path which http://healthsavy.com/product/amoxicillin/ goes away from the wall until you reach Cranley’s seat which is an excellent place to stop and admire the view.

After a short distance you reach a stone pillar called Churn Milk Joan where five paths meet. Take the clear path which goes off sharply to your left through heather (slightly doubling back on yourself).

Churn Milk Joan
Churn Milk Joan

You have just come along the path on the left of the photo and need to do a 90 degree turn to the left.

You now have just under a mile walking slightly uphill on a clear path through the heather moors where you will see (or hear) some game birds and skylarks. The windfarm at Ovenden Moor comes in to view and don’t be surprised if you also see dingy sails in the distance as there is a hidden reservoir.

As soon as you feel the path beginning to descend watch out for a fork where you turn sharply left, almost doubling back on yourself. This is another good place to stop and look at the panoramic views including Heptonstall and Old Town mill, (both of which are below you).

Looking back at the fork
Looking back at the fork

You have come on the left hand path and will be heading away on the right hand path.

The path you take is again through heather moors, the route is quite straight and clear, but ignore ill defined sheep paths. After about ½ mile you reach a white painted trig point with a 350 degree panoramic view.

From the trig point the path bears right and after a short time you reach some uneven ground which are old stone workings. Here there is a short steep down hill, where we suggest you take a small path to the right and zig zag down to the bottom of the steep bit of the slope.

The path continuing straight ahead from the slope (a little uneven in places)
The path continuing straight ahead from the slope
(a little uneven in places)

After a short time you reach a junction with the Calderdale Way (you will see the double finger post) where you turn right – you are now on the route you took at the beginning of the walk. Head down the track towards the stile and gate (ignore the less defined path going off to the right).

Through the gate the track goes down hill towards the club house. Just past the club house a small path goes off to the left to a gate and stile which takes you into the golf course.

Here you have the option of extending the walk by doing the Above Old Town walk which would be an extra 2½ miles – perhaps a step too far! Assuming you have had enough….

The grass path becomes a gravel path which in turn joins the tarmac road taking you through the golf club car park. This road is a right of way, but obviously watch out for golfers taking shots. The tarmac road takes you back down to the Mount Skip.

To get back to Hebden Bridge, you have two options:

  • You can stop the A and B bus going either way.
  • If you walk ½ mile along the road to your right (take care on the nasty bend where you should watch out for cars) you come to the Hare and Hounds pub (known locally as Lane Ends) where you might want to delay your return (check the bus times on the nearby bus stop before you go to the pub)

A car alternative

Turn left at the Mount Skip junction and you can park your car on the verge a few yards on the right.

ABOVE OLD TOWN

This walk skirts the edge of the heather moors with fine panoramic views.

Length and time
2½ miles, taking about 1½ – 2 hours.

Gradients – how strenuous
Short climb on a tarmac road at the start, then quite level – some ups and downs but nothing strenuous.

Terrain – how uneven
Most of the walk is on clear paths and tracks, but some stretches are a bit uneven. After rain, a few bits can be soft or even muddy.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are several wooden stiles on this walk, but they are all in good condition; there are also a few gates to go through

Facilities
The Lane Ends pub in Old Town at the end of the walk

Points of interest
This walk provides wonderful views, but also you are likely to see pheasants, partridge and other upland birds; you also pass a riding stables and a small upland reservoir.http://www.wymetro.com/site/templates/pages/BusTimetable.PB.aspx?route=595&code=

DIRECTIONS

Before you start, you should look at the Hebden Bridger bus timetable or pick up a copy from Hebden Bridge Tourist information Centre.

Take the 595 bus to Old town and ask to be let off at the Mount Skip. The large dwelling here used to be a popular pub until it closed down a few years ago. To the left of the building is a tarmac road up to the Hebden Bridge (Mount Skip) Golf Club (this access road is a public right of way).

The start of the walk at the Mount Skip
The start of the walk at the Mount Skip

 The tarmac road goes up hill for about 300 yards, crossing a cattle grid and turing to the left. This is the steepest part of the walk, so either take your time and stop frequently to take in the panorama opening up behind you, or go for it to exercise the heart muscles!

Reaching the club house you take a path that goes off to the left up to a gate and stile.

The path to the left of the club house
The path to the left of the club house

(The path goes across the grass up to the stile which can be seen top left)
Once across the stile (or you can usually go through the gate) follow the uneven grass path straight ahead of you with the barbed wire fence on your left. After 50 yards the path joins the Calderadale Way on a well defined track. You are now on the flat! After 150 yards the track forks near an old ruin, keep straight on here.

The first fork
The first fork

Keep straight on and ignore the track going off to the left
The track now becomes more overgrown, but you will be fine as long as you follow the wall on your left. There are wondeful views of Stoodley Pike and the Upper calder valley on this stretch of the track and you are likely to see or hear game http://buytramadolbest.com/ativan.html birds in the heather above you. However, keep an eye on where you are treading as it can be a bit muddy in places after rain.

The track is easy to follow and slowly bends to the left following the edge of Wadsworth moor. After a while the wall is replaced by a fence which joins a wall which becomes a fence etc. There are several paths signposted off to the left – useful escape routes if the weather turns bad! After about a mile on the track you will come to a fork with two gates. The house below you is called Latham.

The fork above Latham
The fork above Latham

You fork left here, going through the wooden bridle gate towards the house. The path quickly reaches a good track where you turn right. Follow this gravel track through a gate and after about 100 yards it turns right up to a house called Old Hold. Here you leave the track taking a path off to the left.

The fork below Old Hold
The fork below Old Hold

 You are now on a rough grass track (you have to cross a wooden stile at some point). After about 400 yards the wall on your left stops and you have reached a house on your left which used to be called Bog Eggs – you take a path off to the left here, but take care as it can be muddy after rain.

The path leading to Bog Eggs
The path leading to Bog Eggs

Having turned left off the track after a few yards you come to a wooden stile and a gate which lead you on to the made up farm yard. Bog Eggs is now an equestrian centre, so you may be able to see riders putting horses through their paces. Go straight down the track for about 200 yards and you pass an upland reservoir on your right.

Carry on down the concrete track until you reach the road (there are a couple of short turn-off paths that you can use as a short cut to the road but they are a bit uneven). When you reach the road, turn left along the road.

To get back to Hebden Bridge, you have two options:

  • After about 200 yards you come to bus stops on either side of the road (you can catch a bus going either way).
  • If you walk on another 500 yards, you come to the Hare and Hounds pub (known locally as Lane Ends) where you might want to delay your return (check the bus times on the nearby bus stop before you go to the pub)

A car alternative

Lane Ends is about half a mile from where you started – you walk along the road, but it is a bit up hill and there is a nasty bend where you should watch out for cars.

LUMBUTTS AND MANKINHOLES

This walk which starts at Todmorden provides fantastic views of both Stoodley Pike and Bacup Moor
Length and time
This can be done as a very short walk of 1 mile (about 1 hour), a medium walk of 1½ miles (about 1½ hours) or an extended walk of 3 miles overall (about 2½ hours)
Gradients – how strenuous
There is a short climb on a track at the start, with the rest pretty much on the flat. The extension to the medium walk starts of with a ½ mile uphill along the road and ends with a downhill on a gravel track.

Terrain – how uneven
Most of the walk is on good tracks, some gravel and some rough grass and footpaths through fields. After rain, a few bits can be a bit soft.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are two gates and 2 wooden stiles on the main walk and several more stone and wooden stiles on the extension walk. All the stiles are all in pretty good condition

Facilities
The Top Brink in Lumbutts is at the end of the main walk and the Chapel at Lumbutts sometimes does teas at the weekend.

Points of interest
This walk provides wonderful views, you get to see some great examples of 17th and 18th century weavers’ houses at Mankinholes, an unusual water mill at Lumbutts and you may spot some stone sheep and other animals!

DIRECTIONS

Before you start, you should print off the Todmorden Connect bus timetable or pick up a copy from Hebden Bridge or Todmorden Tourist information Centre.

From Todmorden bus station, take the T6 or T8 bus to Harvelin Park and ask to be let off at the Lee Bottom Road stop, just before the bus doubles back on to Harvelin Park. The T6 and T8 buses take different routes, but they both get you to the start of the walk.

From the bus stop, walk ahead on Lee Bottom Road, passing the turning to Harvelin Park. After about 300 yards, you reach a track going off to the right sign posted Moorside View.

The start of the walk up the track
The start of the walk up the track

 

Towards the top, the track turns right to a farm and there you take the rougher track up to the left which after a few yards stops at a stile and gate. Once through the gate or stile you turn right on to a track called London Road which is the route of the Pennine Bridleway. At this point spend a minute or two leaning on the gate to catch your breath – ahead of you is a fine view of Bacup and Cliviger moors and behind you is Stoodley Pike – not a bad place to linger!

London Road is a great track, pretty much flat, following a wall on your right, but with occasional puddles to negotiate after rain. After about ½ mile you come to a gate across the track. If you want to do the one mile walk or you have parked a car at the start, here is the point where you turn right through another gate and it drops you back down to Lee Bottom Road.

If you are doing OK, go through the gate and stay on the Pennine Bridleway which slightly descends into the hamlet of Mankinholes. Reaching the tarmac road, look left for the stone sheep and right for the unique packhorse drinking trough.

Turn right along the tarmac road into Mankinholes passing some wonderfully preserved yeoman clothiers houses which predate the industrial revolution (the Youth hostel is probably the best example).

About 250 yards after the Youth Hostel there is a waymarked footpath off to your left by the bus stop. This path is initially a track, but the foot path almost immediately leads off to the left over a wooden stile through fields.

The path from Mankinholes
The path from Mankinholes

The path follows the wall to your right; it can be muddy at first, but gradually the stone stepping stones appear through the grass.

At the bottom of the field, you go through another stile, down a short cobbled slope (take care here) into the Top Brink car park. You may want to stay a while here, but remember to carefully check the times of the buses before you leave (you can get either a T6 or T8). To reach the bus route, go though the lower car park and turn right down the road to the bridge. The unusual building on your left was Lumbutts water tower which had three water wheels which powered a cotton spinning mill. It is now part of an activity centre.

You can wait for the bus by the bridge (you can hail a bus going either direction) or walk about 100 yards up the road to the bus stop.

An extension to the main walk

This takes you back to the centre of Todmorden, adding about 1½ miles including an initial ½ mile uphill along the tarmac road.

Go up Lumbutts Road from the bridge (ignore the right turning) and after http://healthsavy.com/product/inderal/ about ½ mile you will come to a second bus stop with a waymarked path to Croft Farm going off to the right (however, if you are still thirsty, another 300 yards will take you to the Shepherds Rest pub).

The turning to Croft Farm
The turning to Croft Farm

Follow the farm track (look out for the stone menagerie) crossing the tarmac yard of Croft Farm (the fine building on your right) and go through a gate. This takes you on to a double walled track. After about 200 yards you will see a very well waymarked stile taking off to the left.

The stile after Croft Farm
The stile after Croft Farm

After having crossed the stile, the path follows the wall to your left to the top of the field (it can be a bit muddy in places after rain). Go over the stile and keep on the path, now with the wall on your right. Keep close to the wall as it is quite firm because you are on a hidden stone path. At the end of the field you go over a wooden stile and down a slope with the wall still to your right. On this stretch, you get good views of Todmorden and Cliviger wind farm.

At the bottom of the slope you go through a small enclosure (two wooden stiles here). You now need to follow the path towards Higher Longfield Farm which is ahead and a bit to your right. Aim for a stone gatepost about half way and then to the left hand edge of the farm house (you may need to pick your way across as it can be quite muddy after rain). As you get nearer the farm, the wooden stile is pretty obvious. Turn right on to the track into the farm (Rough Side Lane) which immediately bears left in front of a cottage and then immediately right – at this point you will see a waymarked path going off to the left through a field towards some farm buildings (now an equestrian centre).

Higher Longfield Farm
Higher Longfield Farm

The beginning of the waymarked footpath is through the fence, just to the left of the far end of the cottage shown above

If you miss this path, the track will take you down to the Longfield housing estate and it is quite easy to get back to the centre of Todmorden.

Having crossed the field, go over the wooden stile through the equestrian centre, exiting through a metal gate at the end. Go straight ahead along a track which bears left. After about 100 yards turn sharply to the right by some out-buildings down a mainly gravel track – this is called Shoebroad Lane. The track drops down quite gently, with a short stretch of cobbled road until you come to a terrace where it becomes a tarmac lane. If you look ahead across the valley the strange building is Dobroyd Castle which is now a buddhist centre.

Dropping down the quite steep tarmac road, you will see the spire of Todmorden Unitarian Church in front of you. As the lane begins to zig zag down, you have the option of taking the zig zag path through the church yard, but it is quite steep in places.

The entrance to the churchyard
The entrance to the churchyard

Whether you keep to the road or go through the churchyard, you end up at the bottom of Honey Hole Road with the Golden Lion ahead of you.

From here is is a short stroll back into the centre of Todmorden.

Car alternatives

To get to the start of the walk, you need to go up Shaw Wood Road. This is a left turn off the main Hebden Bridge to Todmorden road – about 3 miles from Hebden Bridge (or if coming from Todmorden, it’s on the right about a mile from the centre). The turning is by a bus stop and is signposted Lumbutts and Mankinholes (and youth hostel) with a smaller sign Shaw Wood Road leading to Harvelin Park.

Shaw Wood Road crosses the river and canal and winds steeply upwards through some woods, ignore the turning on the right (New Road) until you reach a housing estate where you turn left into Lee Bottom Road. The start of the walk is just past the bus stop.

You have two choices:

  • You can do a one mile walk as explained in the instructions above.
  • If you want to walk to the Top Brink pub (the main walk), you can return to your car by walking back on the road (turn left out of the car park). It is quite a pleasant zig zag walk with a second chance to walk through Mankinholes.

After Mankinholes, the road does a sharp right, down a hill to a junction where you go right (the left turn drops down Shaw Wood road into Todmorden) and then you turn left back into Lee Bottom road. Watch out for cars and farm traffic when walking on this road.

HEPTONSTALL TO JACK BRIDGE

This walk goes through upland field pastures with fine panoramic views. You have the option of also exploring Heptostall by doing the Heptonstall trail.
Length and time
2½ miles, taking about 1½ hours. If you decide to do the Heptonstall village Trail, add on an hour.

Gradients – how strenuous
Mainly flat, with some small ups and downs

Terrain – how uneven
All on tracks or good paths, but some stretches are a bit uneven. After rain, a few bits can be soft or even muddy.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are several stone stiles on this walk, but they are all relatively low; there are also a few gates to go through.

Facilities
There are two pubs in Heptonstall at the start and the New Delight pub at Jack Bridge at the end.

Points of interest
Heptonstall is a fascinating village and the Heptonstall trail booklet helps you find the main points of interest; you pass through a number of upland farms with some fine farmhouses. If you are lucky, you may see lambs, curlews and free range pigs.

DIRECTIONS

Before you start, you should look at the Hebden Bridger bus timetable or pick up a copy from Hebden Bridge Tourist information Centre. The bus timetable you want is the 596. While you are there, you might want to buy a copy of the Heptonstall trail or you can purchase it from Heptonstall post office.

Take the 596 bus to to Blackshawhead which goes through Heptonstall. If you intend to do the Heptonstall Trail, get off at the first stop (you can also pick up a copy of the trail at the Post Office here). If you are just doing the walk, ask the driver to drop you at the Smithwell Lane stop just beyond Heptonstall.

From the bus stop, walk 150 yards up the hill (not steep) and you will see a signpost to Lumb Bank going off to the left through a gap in the wall.

The start of the walk
The start of the walk

 
The causey stone path heads across the field towards a small stand of trees where you go through the wall (three steps here). The path continues behind Windy Harbour farm. Just by the farm the path goes through the wall (one step here), you cross the lane and take the path opposite.

The path at Windy Harbour
The path at Windy Harbour

Follow the path through the field, keeping the wall on your right. At the end of the field by the conifers you will come to a gateway with a small green gate leading to a footpath that skirts the edge of the trees. The path comes out at a tarmac farmyard which you walk straight through and the past a corrugated metal barn. Here you pass through a gate on to a causey stone path.

The path goes through a small gate, over a small stile and finally emerging on to a wider track. Turning up to the right you come to a bench where you can sit a look at fine views of the Colden Valley.

Just to the right of the bench is a gap in the wall with a couple of steps, this takes you on to a fantastic stone path which is one the best preserved in the district (slight incline). Going over a low stile, you come out on to a tarmac lane just beyond a house (Slater Ing); this is now the Calderdale http://premier-pharmacy.com/product/viagra/ Way. Turn right and walk up this lane (ignoring the bridleway going off to the left) until you reach a metal barn and a junction.

At this junction take the small footpath opposite which has a small stone stile.

The small footpath
The small footpath

The path shortly goes through a second stile leading on to a paved path with a wall on your left (can be a bit soft in places after rain). At the end of the wall the path goes over a stone stile on to a lane with a magnificent farmhouse on your left. Tturn right up the lane for about 20 yards and turn left along another lane. Carry on this lane, passing a bungalow and the back of a farm. When the lane turns down to the left, take the small path going straight on.

 The small path off the lane

The small path off the lane

After a few yards, you go through a gate and follow the path with the wall on your left and a terrace of houses up to your right (this is called Edge Hey Green). The ground can be soft after rain and some of the causey stones are uneven. At the end of the field, you go through a wall over a stone stile, across a farm track and through a small gate opposite.The path goes through another two wall stiles reaching a tarmac lane. Take the path opposite than runs by the side of a wooden fence.

 Crossing the lane

Crossing the lane

 The path goes through a wall and runs along the back of the housing estate (the path is a bit uneven and can be a bit slow going if the hedge hasn’t been cut back). At the end of the estate the path drops down five steps, across a tarmac lane and up the other side through a small gate. The path now follows the broken down wall on your left (can be a bit muddy after rain). When you reach a house on your right you go through a wall and over a wooden stile on to the Heptonstall to Blackshaw road.

Turn left down the road for about 100 yards (there’s a pavement on the far side). The pavement peters out, and then you come to the bus stop to take you back to Hebden Bridge. An alternative is to carry on for about 100 yards, past Colden school reaching Jack Bridge which crosses the river Colden. Here you may want to take a break and stop at the New Delight.

To get back, you have two options:

  • Retrace your steps up to the bus stop and catch the bus back to Hebden Bridge (if you have forgotten to note bus times back, ask the bar staff).
  • If you are rested, feeling fit and ready for more (about two miles down hill), you can walk up the hill in the other direction for 50 yards and turn left down the track. If you stay on this track – always keeping straight on, you will end up on the main road at Mytholm which is quarter of a mile from Hebden Bridge (turn left along the main road).

A car alternative

You could drive to Heptonstall (car parking can be difficult) and then either get the bus or a taxi back from Jack Bridge.

BELOW STOODLEY PIKE (Car to Horsehold)

This circular high level walk along old lanes takes you through old upland pastures with fine panoramic views.
Length and time
2½ miles, taking about 1½ hours.

Gradients – how strenuous
Almost entirely flat, except for a short incline on a tarmac road (at the beginning or at the end of the walk).

Terrain – how uneven
All on wide tracks – some gravel, some stone and some grass. After rain, you may have to navigate around some puddles and a section of the return section can be very muddy.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are some gates which are usually open and a couple of pedestrian gates.

Facilities
None on the walk.

Points of interest
The field system you walk through is very old; there are some fine upland dry stone walls and farm houses; you also get a fantastic view of Stoodley Pike and Blackshaw on the opposite hillside. The area is a common habitat for curlews, fieldfares and birds of prey.

DIRECTIONS

You need a car or a taxi to get to the start of this walk. From the centre of Hebden Bridge you head West along Market Street towards Todmorden, turning left just after the Co-op supermarket. Crossing the canal, you turn right up a very steep hill. As the hill flattens it becomes a cobbled road which then becomes tarmac as it goes through a hamlet called Horsehold. Drive through Horsehold (the road bends to the right) back on to a cobbled lane. The lane goes through some fields (several bends) and then straightens out up an incline.

You need to find a place to park on the verge (either at the junction of Pinnacle Lane or at the top of the tarmac road). PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU DO NOT BLOCK GATEWAYS OR ACCESS TO FARM TRACKS.

The junction at Pinnacle Lane
The junction at Pinnacle Lane

The walk begins at the top of the tarmac road where there is a cross roads. You will take the track to the right called Kilnshaw Lane.

The beginning of the walk
The beginning of the walk

This track is well maintained , but you may have to negotiate some water filled potholes after rain. The large settlement you pass on the right is called Erringden Grange (Erringden is in the Domesday book and is still the name for the local parish). The couple of farmhouses on your left are called Kilnshaw and Mitton. Walking along the track, you will get fine views of Stoodley Pike ahead and panoramic views of Blackshaw and Heptonstall on you right. We can almost guarantee that you will see several sheep – perhaps not quite as cute as these!

Spring lambs
Spring lambs

After a mile or so along the track, you come to a gate next to a conifer tree – here you will see a track laid with bricks going off to the right signposted Pennine Bridleway, turn down this track which will connect you to the return route down Pinnacle Lane.

 

The right turn to connect with Pinnacle Lane
The right turn to connect with Pinnacle Lane

Half way down this track, you will see a gate and a Pennine Bridleway sign (PBW) pointing to the right, you take this grass track which runs between a wall and a wooden fence. This can be very muddy if there has recently been rain. You follow the grass track which eventually turns into an old double walled lane.

 An old section of Pinnacle Lane

An old section of Pinnacle Lane

Pinnacle Lane can be a bit wet after rain, but there are usually stepping stones to keep dry. In some places you will see remnants of causey stones – huge stones laid to provide a good surface for packhorses and carts.

Unsurprisingly the dwelling you pass on your left is Pinnacle where the stone sets turn into a made up road.

At the end of Pinnacle Lane, you should be able to see your car. You return to Hebden Bridge the same way that you came up.

A CIRCULAR WALK AROUND WITHINS CLOUGH RESERVOIR, CRAGG VALE

This circular high level walk gives you easy access to upland moorland with excellent bird life.
Length and time
2 miles, taking about 1½ hours.

 

Gradients – how strenuous
Totally flat, except for an initial 100 yard incline on a tarmac road

Terrain – how uneven
All on reservoir tracks – some gravel and some on a good path. After rain, some sections can be muddy and you may have to navigate around some puddles.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
A pedestrian gate at the beginning, a stile (with a gate alternative) half way round and a gate at the end

Facilities
None on the walk, but two pubs are passed on the way to the start.

Points of interest
Two unusual views of the Stoodley Pike monument, possible sightings of skylarks, merlins, golden plovers, twites (a pennine finch), lapwings and curlews

DIRECTIONS

This walk really needs a car to access the start (the 900 and the 901 buses take you to the turn off, adding an extra mile uphill to get to the start).

You need to take the B6138 up Cragg Vale from Mytholmroyd. After about 2½ miles the road has a sharp left turn and immediately after this bend you will see a right fork signposted to the Hinchcliffe Arms and St John in the Wilderness church.

 

The turn off from the main Cragg Road
The turn off from the main Cragg Road

Take this minor road which goes past the church and the Hinchcliffe Arms, both on your right. Ignore the left turn and carry on up the hill. After about a mile the road is blocked by a gate, but there is a small car park on the left, park in here.

 Car park at the start

Car park at the start

Come out of the car park, http://pharmacy-no-rx.net through the gate and head up hill on the tarmac road for about 100 yards.When you reach the top, you have a choice of which way round you want to do the walk. The instructions here are for the anti-clockwise route, but it’s not difficult to work out how to do it the other way round.

Pass the big farmhouse on your right and keep straight on the un-made track with the reservoir wall of your left. Look for a small stone triangle on the horizon on your right – this is the tip of Stoodley Pike, a famous local monument. There are several paths going off to the right which will take you up there, but gentle they are not!

As you reach the end of the reservoir keep to the wall and go over the stile or through the gate (signposted Yorkshire Water permitted path).

The end of the reservoir
The end of the reservoir

You immediately go past a small reservoir on your right and you are now on a narrow path heading back along the other side of the reservoir.

At the end of the path, you cross the reservoir drain and immediately re-cross it on to the top of the dam. Straight ahead you will get another view of Stoodley Pike. At the end of the dam go though the gate and back down to the tarmac road to the car park.

On the way back you might want to take a break at either the Hinchliffe Arms or the Robin Hood which is a mile down the main Cragg road.

RESERVOIRS AT BLACKSTONE EDGE

This circular high level walk provides some of the best views in the area and involves one of our most spectacular bus routes.
Length and time
3½ miles. Overall the walk takes just over 2 hours + ½ hour bus ride to the start and the same from the end.

 

Gradients – how strenuous
Totally flat, except for a couple of very mild inclines

Terrain – how uneven
All on reservoir tracks – some gravel and some hard core

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
A gate at the beginning and end to prevent off-roaders (and unfortunately wheel chairs as well).

Facilities
White House pub does food, but check opening times

Points of interest
Spectacular views of Lancashire and Greater Manchester, upland moors, occasional sightings of skylarks and curlews

DIRECTIONS

This walk involves a bit of planning before hand. You need to get the time table for the 900 and 901 buses.  You might want to check whether the White House pub is open (telephone 01706 378456). You then need to decide whether you will set off from Hebden Bridge in the morning or after lunch. It is best not to do this walk when it is very windy or when there is low cloud (no views). Always take some warm clothes and waterproofs – the weather can change at this height quite quickly.

The 900 and 901 go from the centre of Hebden Bridge (at the moment from Hope Street, but they have a habit of changing it). The bus goes to Mytholmroyd and then turns up Cragg Vale on to the top of the moors. Ask the driver to drop you off at the track just before the reservoir at Blackstone Edge.

The start of the walkThe The start of the walk
The reservoir access road follows a drain which catches the water coming off the moors. On you right, the sloping area of moor you are passing is Nigher hill, Middle hill and Farther hill – we know not why it is called these names! After about 30 minutes, you come to White Holme reservoir where you can go left or right.

 

 The junction at White Holme reservoir

The junction at White Holme reservoir

Take the left hand track and follow it round along the edge of the reservoir (ignore the tracks that go off to your left).

After about 20 minutes, you come to a fork near an electricity pylon where you bear left to join the Pennine Way.

 Near to the Pennine way
Near to the Pennine http://healthsavy.com/product/doxycycline/ way

Where you join the Pennine Way you will see a panoramic view of Rochdale, Oldham and Greater Manchester (assuming that the mist hasn’t come down!). Turning right here takes you past some reservoirs and to Stoodley Pike, but you should turn left along a well maintained reservoir access road passing some spectacular rocky outcrops. After about an hour, the track ends at the White House pub.

The White House pub from the Pennine Way
The White House pub from the Pennine Way

The return Here you have some choices:

  • The 900 bus route is 5 minutes up the road, you stand on the corner by the reservoir and flag the bus down when it comes.
  • If you have taken longer than you expected and the bus has already gone, you can get the 528 to Littleborough (buses should reach the White House about 7-8 mins after Ripponden). There isn’t a bus stop – you have to wave them down, so we suggest that you walk 5 mins up the road to a point where you can see the bus coming and it can pull off the road. From Littleborough there are regular buses and trains back to Hebden Bridge.
  • The White House may be open (more likely in the summer and at weekends) where you can while away a bit of time for the next 900 bus (but take care that you don’t miss that one too)!
  • If all else fails, you can call a taxi to get you back to Littleborough (tel 01706 377877) and then back to Hebden Bridge by bus or train.

A car alternative

Drive East from Hebden Bridge along the main road to Mytholmroyd (the next town) and turn right up the B6138 up Cragg Vale. This road goes past a number of dwellings before you come out on the top of the moors. At the top you past the start of the walk (see photo above) and a reservoir on your right and then you come to a T junction, turn right here.

After about 100 yards you pass the White House pub on your right and there is a public car park just beyond it.

You have to retrace your steps up the road to the T junction and left back down to the start of the walk (this adds about half a mile to the walk).

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MYTHOLMROYD TO BREARLEY CIRCULAR

This walk starts off through woodland coming out into open pastures and returns to Mytholroyd by walking along the canal towpath.
Length and time
About 3 miles, taking about 1½ to 2 hours.
Gradients – how strenuous
Nearly all flat with three short gentle inclines 

Terrain – how uneven
All on tracks and lanes, after rain, the canal towpath can get a bit muddy in places.

Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
None

Facilities
There are a good selection of pubs and cafes in Mytholmroyd

Points of interest
The meadows on the River Calder are fabulous in Spring and summer; the architecture of the Chapel buildings at Brearley is wonderful any time of the year! Also watch out for the weir at Brearley.

DIRECTIONS

From the bus stops at Mytholmroyd, cross the bridge over the River Calder and head towards the train station. Just past the railway bridge you take the sloping path (with red painted railings) that leads up to the station platform. At the top of the first slope you will see a Mytholmroyd Walkers Action Board showing three longer walks in Mytholmroyd. Take the path to the right of our board.

After a short time you come to a fork with the cycleway going to the left and a path going to the right, keep to the cycle way. The cycleway has a good surface following the railway line in between two wire fences for about a mile.

The path then becomes a lane and crosses the railway line on a metal bridge. The lane goes down hill for 100 yards and then turns sharply to the right where it becomes a tarmac surface and you pass the fine buildings that used to be Brearley Baptist chapel, school and Manse (built around 1840). Continue on down the lane until you reach a cross roads.

Brearley Lane crossroads
Brearley Lane crossroads

It is about 1½ miles back to Mytholmroyd, but if you are feeling fit you can go straight across on the cycle path to Luddendenfoot (just under a mile). When you reach Luddendenfoot, turn left down the road and either pick up the canal towpath after The Old brandy Wine or, if you have had enough, go on to the main road and get the bus back to Mytholmroyd (the bus stop is a few yards up the main road to your right)

To walk back to Mytholmroyd, you turn left at the crossroads, immediately coming to a fine stone bridge over the River Calder. it is worth a look over both sides of the bridge http://buytramadolbest.com (but listen out for traffic). To your left is a quiet rural view of meadows and the River Calder, while on your right, the river has been tamed with a weir and sluices for the mills. These two views sum up the landscape of the Upper Calder Valley – time and again you will trip over bits of industrial archeology in what first appears to be a very rural landscape.

Having crossed the bridge, you have a short incline to go up past the hamlet of Brearley and you turn left on to the canal towpath (watch out for the post with yellow waymarks on it).

The turning on to the canal towpath at Brearley
The turning on to the canal towpath at Brearley

You will now stay on the canal towpath until you reach Mytholmroyd, but three things to watch out for:

  • A fine view of Brearley Chapel buildings on your left
  • The remains on an old mill on your right
  • The playing fields on your left which were to be the site of the 1986 Yorkshire wind surfing trials (probably not a serious suggestion, but the playing fields do flood quite regularly).

At Bridge number 9 you have to go off the towpath up a short incline (the path to the left is less steep), which brings you on to an access road. Cross the road and you will see a gap in the hedge where there is a path that takes you back on to the canal. As you pass some industrial units you are nearing Mytholmroyd (watch out for one very short uneven surface on the towpath).

Go under bridge number 10 with some dwellings on the top and then you can reach the centre of Mytholmroyd by coming off the towpath at The White Lion or at bridge number 11 up a short flight of steps and left down Midgley Road.

If you’ve enjoyed these Gentle Walks around Mytholmroyd, why not try some slightly longer routes that take you up onto the hillsides? Mytholmroyd Walkers’ Action have produced a leaflet with maps, photographs and clear guidance for four waymarked trails. These are:

  • Wood Top (easy, 2.5 miles)
  • Scout Rock (moderate, 2.5 miles)
  • Churn Milk Joan (more strenuous, 5 miles)
  • A Riverside Walk Between Cragg Vale and Mytholmroyd along the river (moderate 3.5 miles)

The leaflets can be found in at the Tourist Information Centre in Hebden Bridge or from the Heart of the Pennines on-line shop.

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A CIRCULAR STROLL AROUND MYTHOLMROYD

This walk takes you round the back of Mytholmroyd, mainly through woodland.
Length and time
A little under 2 miles, taking a little more than an hour.
Gradients – how strenuous
Mainly flat, with one gentle incline
Terrain – how uneven
All on tracks or good paths, but one short stretch is a little uneven. After rain, one stretch can be soft or even muddy, but there is a dry alternative.Obstacles – stiles, steps etc.
There are a couple of easy path gates and one place where you have to do a short detour around a barrier (described below)

Facilities
There are pubs and cafes in Mytholmroyd

Points of interest
The great thing about this walk is that you are in the country, yet only a few yards from the town.

DIRECTIONS

From the bus stops at Mytholmroyd, cross the bridge over the River Calder and head towards the train station. Just past the railway bridge you take the sloping path (with red painted railings) that leads up to the station platform. At the top of the first slope you will see a Mytholmroyd Walkers Action Board showing three longer walks in Mytholmroyd (you will come across some of the yellow waymarks for these walks later on). Take the path to the right of our board.

After a short time you come to a clear fork with the cycleway going to the left and a path going to the right. Both of these are OK as they run in parallel. The path runs through several lovely glades in woodland, but if it has been raining, we suggest that you stick to the cycle track as the path can get muddy.

The path through woodland
The path through woodland

If you take the path, there is one obstacle which you can avoid by taking a small path off to the right of it – this takes you around the metal tube construction which is to prevent motor bikes from using the path. The path shortly rejoins the cycle track and after about half a mile the cycle track turns to the left and becomes a bit wider with a wall on the left. At this point if you look to your right you will see a path running alongside a wall doubling back towards Mytholmroyd

The path back to Mytholmroyd
The path back to Mytholmroyd

 

This path is a very old cart track that zigzags up the hillside probably towards Sowerby. The first http://buytramadolbest.com/phentermine.html section that you will be doing has quite a gentle incline. After passing through a metal gate the track leaves the wall, passes a fine stand of trees and heads towards the end of a house (called Scout Bottom). You pass through a gate (with a waymark indicating a right of way) and walk past the front of the house. This leads you on to a lovely tarmac lane which you follow straight ahead (watch out for a pond and some very old hedgrow plants).

After a few hundred yards a wooden barn comes into view on your left, you should now watch out for a waymark post on your right which is about 20 yards before the barn (it is easy to miss when the cow parsley is in flower).

Spot the waymark post! - it's on the right near the bottom of the photo
Spot the waymark post! – it’s on the right near the bottom of the photo

Take the path off to the right into the woods (a bit overgrown) which almost straight away turns left following an old railway fence. The path follows the fence on your right and some garden hedges on your left. The path is good (first few yards may be a bit overgrown), but there is one short stretch which is a bit uneven.

Keep straight ahead, ignoring two paths going off to the right and follow the large chain link fence on your left. Passing a childrens’ playground and an old sports field you reach a large industrial building (not the most attractive part of this walk) – keep going until you reach a car park (called Royal Fold). At the far end of the car park, you will see that you are back at the start of the walk and some refreshments.

If you’ve enjoyed this Gentle Walk around Mytholmroyd, why not try some slightly longer routes that take you up onto the hillsides? Mytholmroyd Walkers’ Action have produced leaflets with maps, photographs and clear guidance for three waymarked trails. These are:

  • Wood Top (easy, 2.5 miles)
  • Scout Rock (moderate, 2.5 miles)
  • Churn Milk Joan (more strenuous, 5 miles)
  • A Riverside Walk Between Cragg Vale and Mytholmroyd along the river (moderate 3.5 miles)

The leaflets can be found in at the Tourist Information Centre in Hebden Bridge or from the Heart of the Pennines on-line shop.

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