Walkers’ publications

pubs1South Pennines and the Bronte Moors – Andrew
Bibby.
This Wainwright-sized guide to the walking
opportunities in the South Pennines focuses on land opened up to
walkers by the Right to Roam legislation. The guide includes: an
introduction to the area: its landscape, history and natural history;
12 free-range rambles, graded for difficulty, that allow walkers to
choose their own route; a full-page 4-colour OS map for each walk;
special features on points of interest chosen to add to walkers’
enjoyment of the countryside; practical information for visitors; a
guide to public rights of access.

pubs2e-trails differ from most walking guides -you can download images and spoken descriptions of the highlights of the walk. You can walk without
downloading anything, but the app will bring alive the walk. The printed Guide (£1.50) includes before you start info, printed Map and directions.
The App costs £0.79p (Power In The Landscape & Charlestown
FREE), includes map, images & Commentary at all points of
interest. Download the app at iTunes or  Android Play Store, search for Pennine Horizons. Click on the application and follow the instructions to download. For list of eTrails go to the Pennine http://healthsavy.com/product/xenical/ horizons website


pubs3The West Yorkshire Moors by
Christopher Goddard
– a new hand-drawn guide from Chris
Goddard; a superb work with wonderfully drawn sketches, buildings,
rocks and maps. Chris has been meticulous in his research and has spent
six years preparing this remarkable book.

The West Yorkshire Moors is an original
cartographic guide to all of West Yorkshire’s open access moorland,
large parts of which were not until recently accessible to the walkers,
fell-runners and antiquarians who wanted to explore them.

 

pubs4Gone Walkabout: 24 Walks in
the Calder Valley – Anna Carlisle.
First having
appeared in the Hebden Bridge Times and Todmorden
News
, the twenty-four walks featured in this book are
designed to have any sedentary Calder Valley dwellers haul themselves
up out of their armchairs and on to their own beautiful ‘tops’ so Close
to Home – and secondly, to take the more serious walking enthusiast
‘Further Afield’ and onto the remotest western reaches of our county –
and even into the neighbouring one.